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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 17-22

Taste function and salivary analysis in patients with oral sensorial complaints


1 Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, Delhi, India
2 Department of Otorhinolaryngology, District Hospital, Gyalshing, Sikkim, India
3 Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, Delhi, India
4 Department of Psychiatry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Neelima Gupta
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, A-304, Abhyant Apartment, Vasundhara Enclave, Delhi - 110 096
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijohr.ijohr_18_19

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Background: Taste dysfunction is a troublesome condition which causes subjective discomfort, impairs appetite, and leads to decrease in food intake. Patients often present to otorhinolaryngologists with a complaint of burning sensation in the mouth and associated taste dysfunction. We sought to study the taste dysfunction and do salivary analysis in these patients because studies reporting objective evidence of taste dysfunction in patients with such oral sensorial complaints (OSCs) are scarce. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients with OSCs and taste disturbances; and 35 healthy controls with no oral complaints and no taste disturbances were studied. Objective taste score was calculated using impregnated filter paper strips. Whole unstimulated salivary flow, salivary ions estimation (Na+ and K+), and psychometric profile assessment using the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 questionnaire and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale questionnaire were done. Results: The mean taste score in the OSC group was 20.80 ± 2.753, and in controls, it was 28.11 ± 2.564, showing a statistically significant difference. About 54% of the cases had decreased taste function. The whole unstimulated salivary flow rate (mL/min) in cases was 0.58 ± 0.10, and in controls, it was 0.78 ± 0.73; difference being statistically not significant (P = 0.066). Salivary ions showed higher levels in cases. The psychometric profile showed a higher rate of depression and stress in cases and a higher oral health impact score. Conclusion: We concluded that there is objective evidence of taste aberration in patients with OSCs. The subjective grading of reported taste dysfunction did not correlate with the objective taste scores, and there was an increased incidence of depression, anxiety, and stress in patients with OSCs and taste dysfunction.


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