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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 4-6

Diabetes Mellitus and Oral Cancer: Are They Connected?


1 Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Mangalore, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Pharmacology, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, Karnataka, India
3 Department of General Medicine, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, Karnataka, India
4 Department of Psychiatry, Father Muller Medical College, Mangalore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Nandita Shenoy
Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Mangalore, Affiliated to Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2393-8692.158901

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Introduction: Malignant neoplasm is a major cause of death in developed countries, and its incidence continues to grow, placing a heavy burden on the community. Diabetes mellitus is a serious and leading health problem. Recent studies demonstrated that glucose intolerance was associated with a higher risk of oral cancer death, beginning in the prediabetic range of glucose intolerance. However, few population-based studies, especially in Asian populations, have addressed these issues or have estimated glucose intolerance status. Aim: We undertook this study with the aim of finding out an association between impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and oral cancer along with finding out prevalence of other risk factors for oral cancer. Materials and Methods: Forty-five cases and 45 controls were selected for the study. Oral glucose tolerance was performed on subjects who satisfied inclusion criteria and were willing to sign informed consent form. Results: Fifty-three percent of the cases had abnormal glucose tolerance when compared to 31% of the controls. Conclusion: To conclude, hyperglycemia (which includes impaired fasting glucose, IGT and diabetes) increases the risk of oral cancer two-fold, however IGT alone as defined by American Diabetes Association does not appear to play a role.


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